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The fact that torture is not investigated under the rule of law is inadmissible

David Guadilla, from the El Correo newspaper, interviewed me in mid-December 2014 and the interview was published on 26th December that year. Unfortunately, many of the questions in the interview, and the replies too, if I may say so, are still perfectly relevant today. As with other articles and interviews, it is my intention to translate them to English in due course. When I finally manage to do so, I will publish the translation here. Until then, you can see the original version in the link below.

The interview was a consequence of our visit to the Basque Parliament to carry out a presentation of the report jointly drafted by the Argituz, AEN, Ekimen Elkartea, GAC, Jaiki-Hadi, OME and OSALDE associations titled “Incomunicado Detention and Torture”, the Spanish version of which can be consulted here and the version in Basque here.

To address the global prevalence of torture and the common denial of the existence of that torture by those responsible, in 1996,
several organizations came together and began what would become a three-year process to develop the Manual on the Effective
Investigation and Documentation of Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment (The Istanbul
Protocol). This process involved more than seventy-five health, legal and human rights experts representing over forty organizations,
including the International Rehabilitation Council for Torture Victims (IRCT). The result of this process was the first set of international guidelines for the investigation and documentation of torture and ill-treatment. Its overarching Principles on the Effective Investigation and Documentation of Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment (The Istanbul Principles) were adopted by the
United Nations (UN) General Assembly in 2000.The Istanbul Protocol and its Principles have since been applied in international and
national courts and endorsed by the UN and other key human rights bodies. Our report also used this tool to ascertain the veracity of victims’ reports, which are constantly questioned in Spain.

This interview was published in